Salsa Dance

Salsa is known to have emerged from the Afro-Cuban Rumba and Son dancing styles in the period around 1940.

Salsa is known to have emerged from the Afro-Cuban Rumba and Son dancing styles in the period around 1940. There are various styles of salsa. The characteristics that identify a style include timing, body movement, foot patterns, body rolls, attitude, the way two partners hold each other, etc. The different Salsa styles include Colombian/Cali style, Cuban “Casino” style, Miami style, Rueda de style, Los Angeles style and New York style. A partnership of two people can go on to create amazing experiences and memories with the beautiful art of salsa dancing.

 

Benefits Of Salsa Dancing

 1)The touch aspect of dancing with a partner may offer some special perks. Touch is the first sense that emerges during infancy, and as suggested by experts any human-to-human physical contact, especially touching, improves well-being and reduces stress and anxiety.

2)The psychological benefits are also impressive. For decades, some therapists have prescribed dancing as an effective therapy for those who suffer from social anxiety or fear of public speaking. The idea: if you can loosen up enough to boogie in front of strangers, you’re a lot less likely to feel self-conscious when hanging out or speaking in front of an audience.

3)As suggested by a study from the University of Oxford, dancing seems to encourage social bonding. Like many a time it happens while chatting with a stranger we find out that both of us attended the same school or grew up in the same neighbourhood, similarly, moving and grooving in rhythm with others in a group class, lights up the brain pathways that blur the barriers our mind erects between ourselves and a stranger and so helps us feel a sense of connection and sameness.

4) Recent studies that compared the neurological effects of social dancing with those of walking/swimming or any such other physical activities suggests that there may be something unique about learning a social dance. The demand, it places, on the mind and body could make it unusually potent at slowing some of the changes in our skulls that seem otherwise inevitable with ageing. It seems likely that the cognitive demands of the dancing, which require people to learn and master new choreography in the group classes, improve the processing speed and memory of our brain.

To learn Contemporary Dance in Gurugram contact us at  

Anu Gupta (Ph: 9717377575)
Manwinder Singh (Ph: 9643298604)

E-mail – beatthebeats2016@gmail.com

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